Thursday, June 18, 2015

Short Wedding Dresses




Woman Getting Married

Dresses by: Sarah Seven​

Short wedding dresses are NOT just for City Hall weddings or brides wanting to change into a different look for the reception. There are so many wedding venues that are just screaming for a short wedding dress. From beach ceremonies to Tuscany wedding themes, the RIGHT short wedding dress can be appropriate for so many different wedding styles.

The good news about short wedding dresses? Well aside from the fact that your chances of actually wearing it AGAIN are sky-high, they also typically cost less than your average designer wedding dress. Of course you can still find short wedding dresses from top designers for thousands of dollars, but overall shopping at stores like BHLDN you'll find that the dresses are much less expensive. The following dresses range in price, style, and overall feel:

Woman Getting Married

Dress by Monique Lhuillier

Woman Getting Married

Dress by Delphine Manivet. Photo by Donja Pitsch for Glamour EspaƱa

Woman Getting Married

The Chelsea Bridal Collection by Vintage Atelier designed by Nafisa Nuri

Woman Getting Married

Dress by Carolina Herrera

Woman Getting Married

Dress by Marco and Maria



Woman Getting Married

Dress by Candy Anthony

Woman Getting Married

Dress by Marchesa

Woman Getting Married

Lilian Dress from BHLDN | Photo by Jenna Bechtholt Photography

Woman Getting Married

Dresses by Krikor Jabotian

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Dress by Francesca Miranda

Woman Getting Married

Dress by Matthew Christopher

Woman Getting Married

Dress by Anna Kara


Woman Getting Married

Dress by Mira Zwillinger

Woman Getting Married

Watters' Encore 'Guava' Dress





Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Use Eye Glasses to Update Your Look

 

One of the easiest, fastest ways to update your look is by investing in a new pair of eye glasses. With 57% of the American population using some type of eyewear (I'm guessing other modern countries have similar numbers), it's easy to see who's kept current and who hasn't when it comes to eyewear: the large, 1980's style of specs are "out"; the smaller vintage and geometrics styles are "in".
If you don't have a lot of money to spend on a new wardrobe, or if you've gotten so used to seeing yourself in your current frames that you haven't given the matter any attention in a while, now's a good time to review your options.
 The Pretty Things Consultant
 Eye glasses-like hairstyles-can date you instantly, so this is one area that requires occasional review.
First, A Little Background.

Did you know that reading glasses first appeared in Italy in the 1260's? Designed to "help the elderly to read," these were a godsend to those whose vision had become blurred due to age. Their popularity was instantaneous, and paintings from the time began to depict wearers in both religious and scholarly settings.
But the initial design had a huge problem: with only the bare basics of lenses and a nose bridge, there was no easy way to keep the darn things from slipping down the nose. You had to hold them in place, which limited their use. The Spaniards tried connecting them to ribbons looped around the ears, but that never really caught on. In fact, it wasn't until 1730-nearly 500 years after they were first introduced-that a London optician named Edward Scarlett finally devised the rigid sidepieces that rest atop the ears. The perfection spread rapidly, and is still in use today.
Benjamin Franklin is often credited with inventing eye glasses, but in fact he was the one who developed the bifocal lens in the 1780's, because he got tired of changing to reading glasses whenever he opened a book, which was often. He had his optician cut the lenses in two so he just had to look up and down instead of switching glasses. This is another revision that's still in use today.
So what's the difference between eye glasses and spectacles? Today the terms are used interchangeably, but at the turn of the last century, there was a clear demarcation: "eye glasses" was the term used to describe eyewear with no sidebar, while "spectacles" referred to frames with sidebars.
Popular among the elite for over a hundred years, "temporary" sight aids like eye glasses, the monocle (single round glass); and the lorgnette (a style held up to the eyes with a long handle which was widely used by elegant women), came and went because of one simple factor: vanity. One simply did not admit that one could not see unassisted in public. These vision aids were designed to be pulled out and put away quickly, yet still maintain some semblance of style for the few minutes they were in use.
While the English and French in particular were very rigid in their opinion that eye glasses only be worn in private, the Spaniards believed that glasses made them look more important and dignified and they quickly became a popular accessory among all the classes. In fact, Spanish paintings from the Middle Ages show Moses, Jesus, and other biblical figures wearing glasses, to give them an added air of dignity.
But the Spanish were in the minority. The stigma of wearing spectacles lasted well into the 20th century. While Dorothy Parker proclaimed, "Men don't make passes at girls who wear glasses," in 1926, Marilyn Monroe's character Pola Debevoise preferred walking into walls to being seen in glasses in the 1953 movie "How To Marry a Millionaire."
Contact lenses quickly earned their way as the discreet eye aid of choice when a New York optometrist named William Feinbloom made the lenses out of plastic in 1936 and they finally became comfortable to wear.

First conceived and sketched by Leonardo da Vinci in 1508 (big surprise), contact lens technology did not begin to come together until 1827, when English astronomer Sir John Herschel suggested grinding a contact lens to conform exactly to the eye's surface. A German glassblower named F. E. Muller produced the first eye covering designed to be seen through and tolerated in 1887, and within a year, both a Swiss physician and a French optician reported using contacts to correct optical defects. Still, until the method for taking molds from living eyes was perfected in 1929, contacts were uncomfortable and consequently, unpopular.
So when did sunglasses make a splash? In 1929, when Sam Foster convinced a Woolworth store on the Atlantic City Boardwalk to sell his Foster Grants. They became popular in the 1930's when movie stars started to wear them.
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Diana Pemberton-Sikes is a wardrobe and image consultant and author of Accessory Magic, an ebook that shows women how to use their fashion accessories to define their style and stretch their budgets. Visit her online at www.fashionforrealwomen.com .  Accessory Magic teaches you about eye glasses

Buying A Handbag? Here's What to Look For

The Pretty Things Consultant


What should you look for when buying a handbag?
While many fashionistas would say that the designer label is the most important consideration, you and I are smarter than that. Yes, some designers do have cool, functional handbags, but there's a lot more at stake here than the name on the outside. After all, you "wear" your handbag every day, so like everyday shoes, it makes sense to invest wisely.
If you don't have a lot of time to think about this accessory every day--and most women don't--then your best bet is to opt for basic styles in neutral colors. In fact, if you build your wardrobe around three or four primary colors, then you'll need fewer handbags to see you through. You can then spend a lot of money on quality pieces that will last you for many years.
Here are some guidelines to get the most for your money:
1. While matching handbag to shoe color is no longer a "do-or-die" rule, they should be in the same family of colors (rust handbag, brown shoes, or gray handbag, black shoes, for example) and the handbag should harmonize with the colors of your outfit.
2. The personality of the handbag should be compatible with the mood of your clothes-sporty with sporty, business with business, romantic with romantic, etc.
3. Leather is the best choice for year-round use. Warm weather alternatives include a neutral-colored canvas or straw bag, both of which work well with a variety of shoe colors.
4. Make sure the bag you're considering will hold all of your normal contents. If in doubt, empty the purse you're carrying into the bag you're considering to check its capacity before you buy.
5. Know the store's return policy. If, after considering all the criteria listed above, the bag still doesn't work for you, you'll want to be able to return it.
Whatever you do, DO consider your lifestyle when investing in a handbag. There's nothing worse than buying something on impulse and then having it sit in your closet for years to come. Take care of your investment with regular care, and replace zippers and snaps as needed. Your local shoe repair shop should be able to help you with this.
So what's the bottom line?
THINK before investing in a new bag, particularly if it's a designer handbag. It's the only way to justify the expense.
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Diana Pemberton-Sikes is a wardrobe and image consultant and author of Accessory Magic, an ebook that shows women how to use their fashion accessories to define their style and stretch their budgets. Visit her online at www.fashionforrealwomen.com .
 Accessory Magic shows you how to buy a handbag




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How To Add To Your Jewelry Collection

Thinking about adding to your jewelry collection?
Diamond necklaceBefore you reach for the latest piece to catch your eye, take a good look in your jewelry box to assess what you already have. For just as you can get "stuck in a rut" with your clothing, so, too, can your jewelry accessorizing suffer from lack of creativity. Before you duplicate something you already have, take a few minutes to survey your current collection to see what you can REALLY use.
Let's start with some basics.
There are three categories of jewelry: fine, bridge, and costume.
Fine jewelry consists of metals like platinum, gold, and silver, and gems like diamonds, rubies, sapphires and emeralds. Fine jewelry is the level we often aspire to but can only afford in small doses.


Bridge jewelry
 is better than costume but not as good as fine, and is made from semi-precious stones, natural woods, enamels, porcelains, and the like. If you can't afford fine jewelry, bridge pieces offer an excellent, long-lasting alternative.


Costume jewelry
 is gentle on the budget and can add flair and fun to your casual looks. If you're a devotee of following the latest fads, costume jewelry is the way to go. You'll find it in a variety of price ranges, and some even emulate fine and bridge categories.
Once you've looked over your collection, you'll probably notice that most of your pieces fall into one category. These are the pieces you wear the most or used to wear a lot of once upon a time (before babies, retirement, moving to a tropical island, or whatever).
So now's the time to ask yourself some serious questions, like:
* Which of my pieces need updating? Or replacing? Or repair?
* Could I extend my current jewelry wardrobe by adding a key piece like a long chain, a pendant, or diamond studs?
* Is it time to upgrade a favorite costume piece with a more durable bridge level look-a-like?
* Should I sell or give away some of my older, unworn pieces to make way for newer selections I WILL wear?
* Would I wear what I have more often if the whole mess were organized in a more user-friendly fashion...like in a new, roomier jewelry box?
Now you've probably never given the matter this much thought before, but perhaps it's time to do just that. Often, we're given pieces that aren't "us" and that end up filling our jewelry boxes, never to see the light of day. Why smile through another monogrammed heart-shaped pendant when a stunning pin you've wanted costs just the same? Or add yet another gold chain when an onyx one would work with more outfits?
If you really want to do justice to your jewelry collection, take a few minutes to really go through what you have. Pull the things you don't wear, inventory the things you do wear, and make a list of what you need to round out your jewelry wardrobe. You'll be able to look good, save money, and invest wisely, all at the same time.
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Diana Pemberton-Sikes is a wardrobe and image consultant and author of Accessory Magic, an ebook that shows women how to use their fashion accessories to define their style and stretch their budgets. Visit her online at www.fashionforrealwomen.com .
 Accessory Magic teaches you about jewelry


Jungle Prints